MMM2012

18th International Conference on MultiMedia Modeling, Klagenfurt, Austria, January 4-6, 2012

Keynote Speakers

We are honored to announce the following inspiring invited speakers this year!

Keynotes

Mini-Keynote


Keynote 1: A new gap to bridge: Where to go next in social media retrieval?

Speaker:
Dr. Alan Hanjalic
Associate Professor & Coordinator of the Delft Multimedia Information Retrieval Lab

Abstract:
Research in Multimedia Information Retrieval (MIR) aims at matching multimedia content and user needs and so at bringing image, audio and video content together with users. Users’ expectations regarding multimedia content access in terms of semantically rich and personalized relevance criteria have always been high and have imposed high demands on the level of sophistication of MIR solutions. The potential to develop MIR technology that meets such high demands has rapidly grown over the past twenty years by building on intensive international research effort. This growth accelerated, however, with the increasing contextualization of images, video and music in rapidly expanding social networks that link distributed content, diverse metadata and users of various profiles and interests. It is clear that user demands regarding the sophistication of MIR technology have further grown in the social network context in view of new ways of interacting with multimedia content and with other people via and about this content. However, this new context has also brought vast new opportunities for improving the quality of MIR solutions. These opportunities lie in synergetic integrations of multidisciplinary scientific contributions and rich information resources found there. Revisiting MIR from the viewpoint of the social network context, using the approaches that are often jointly referred to as social media retrieval, can help the field not only resolve the problems that impeded its development in the past, but also address the new emerging demands. I will show how contextualizing the MIR in online networked communities of users can help us achieve a fundamental shift in the MIR grand challenge, from bridging the research-oriented semantic gap to bridging the much more important, user-oriented utility gap, that explicitly addresses the overall usefulness of a MIR system output for the user. I will highlight some of the opportunities in pursuing this new, utility-oriented MIR grand challenge.

Bio:
Dr. Alan Hanjalic is an Associate Professor and coordinator of the Multimedia Information Retrieval Lab at the Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands. He was a visiting scientist at Hewlett-Packard Labs, British Telecom Labs, Philips Research and Microsoft Research Asia. Research interests of Dr. Hanjalic are in the area of multimedia information retrieval where he (co-)authored/edited more than 100 publications, including three books. Dr. Hanjalic was a Keynote Speaker at the Pacific-Rim Conference on Multimedia, Hong-Kong, December 2007, and is an elected member of the IEEE TC on Multimedia Signal Processing. He has been on editorial boards of several journals in the field, among which the IEEE Transactions on Multimedia, IEEE Transactions on Affective Computing and the International Journal of Multimedia Information Retrieval, and has served as General Chair or Program Chair of the leading conferences in his field, such as ACM Multimedia, IEEE ICME, ACM CIVR and ACM ICMR.


Keynote 2: Mining Multimedia Data for Meaning

Speaker:
Dr. John R. Smith
IBM T. J. Watson Research Center

Abstract:
The explosion of images, video and multimedia is creating a valuable source for insights.  It can tell us about things happening in the world, give clues about a person’s preferences or experiences, indicate places of interest in a new town, and even capture a rolling log of our history.  But, as a non-traditional source for data mining, there are numerous challenges to be overcome in order to handle the volume, velocity and variety of multimedia data in practice.  In this talk, we review several application areas across Web, social media, mobile and safety/security and show how they benefit from mining of multimedia data.  We review novel approaches for modeling semantics and automatically classifying visual contents and demonstrate examples in the context of IBM Multimedia Analysis and Retrieval System (IMARS).

Bio:
John R. Smith is Senior Manager, Intelligent Information Management Dept. at IBM T. J. Watson Research Center. He received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Columbia University in 1997. His research interests include image and video databases, content analysis, compression, indexing, and retrieval.  Dr. Smith was co-editor of MPEG-7 Multimedia Metadata Standard and Chair of MPEG Multimedia Description Schemes group.  He currently leads IBM’s multimedia analysis and retrieval research.  He is currently Editor-in-Chief of IEEE MultiMedia.  Dr. Smith is IEEE Fellow.


Keynote 3: Challenges in Serious Gaming as Emerging Multimedia Technology for Education, Training, Sports and Health

Speaker:
Prof. Dr.-Ing. Ralf Steinmetz
Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology & in the Department of Computer Science at the Technische Universität Darmstadt

Abstract:
Digital computer games are very popular and successful, both as leisure activity and contemporary information and communication medium in the digital age, and as relevant economic factor and prospering market, not only in the creative industries. Games tackle a diversity of research aspects, e.g. Computer Graphics, AI, Storytelling, interfaces and sensors, authoring and production, usability and user experience or other ICT and multimedia technologies. Game technology and game techniques are broadly used by other application domains apart from pure entertainment as well.
The rather new field of Serious Games, games with an additional purpose other than mere entertainment, offers a variety of new challenges and new fields of research. In our opinion, the term Serious Games comprises games for education (in terms of learning and practice), training, sports, and health. The core idea of Serious Games is to use the motivation inherited in games for other purposes like learning, sports, rehabilitation exercises, or even advertisement or opinion forming. Prominent examples in the field of Serious Games (games ‘more than fun’) are games for health, persuasive games, advergames or games for education and training, for instance in the form of multiplayer online games as tools to support collaborative learning settings. The combination of gaming technologies and gaming concepts with other research disciplines, technologies, methods and concepts results in a broad range of application do-mains. The resulting research areas are Authoring of Serious Games, Collaborative Learning using multiplayer Serious Games, Serious Games in Social Networks, and sensor technology for Serious Games for Sports & Health.
In this talk, we will review the various aspects and application areas of Serious Games and point out some of the grand challenges in the field of Serious Gaming.
Some of the core research topics of the Serious Games at the Technische Universität Darmstadt and the httc will be reviewed. StoryTec, an authoring environment for the creation of Serious Games for non-programmers, will be illustrated, as well as 3D multiplayer Serious Games for collaborative learning and team (leader) training. Furthermore, Serious Games for sports & health, especially for fall prevention, rehabilitation, and management of obesity will be outlined.

Bio:
Prof. Dr.-Ing. Ralf Steinmetz is a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology as well as in the Department of Computer Science at the Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany. From 2002 to 2004, he managed the department as dean. Since 1996, he is managing director of the “Multimedia Communications Lab” and until end of 2001, he directed a Fraunhofer Institute. In 1999, he founded the Hessian Telemedia Technology Competence Center and holds a chair position. He is the author and co-author of more than 550 publications. He has edited and co-written a multimedia course which reflects the major issues of the first in-depth technical book on multimedia technology. He has served as editor of various IEEE, ACM and other journals. He was awarded as Fellow of both, the IEEE and the ACM. He is a member of the Scientific Council and president of the Board of Trustees of the international research institute IMDEA Networks, Madrid, Spain. In 2005, he became a member of the Technology Advisory Board of Hessen and serves as Hessen’s Advisor for Information and Communications Technology (ICT).

Dr. Alan Hanjalic is an Associate Professor and coordinator of the Multimedia Information Retrieval Lab at the Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands. He was a visiting scientist at Hewlett-Packard Labs, British Telecom Labs, Philips Research and Microsoft Research Asia. Research interests of Dr. Hanjalic are in the area of multimedia information retrieval where he (co-)authored/edited more than 100 publications, including three books. Dr. Hanjalic was a Keynote Speaker at the Pacific-Rim Conference on Multimedia, Hong-Kong, December 2007, and is an elected member of the IEEE TC on Multimedia Signal Processing. He has been on editorial boards of several journals in the field, among which the IEEE Transactions on Multimedia, IEEE Transactions on Affective Computing and the International Journal of Multimedia Information Retrieval, and has served as General Chair or Program Chair of the leading conferences in his field, such as ACM Multimedia, IEEE ICME, ACM CIVR and ACM ICMR. 

Mini-Keynote: Multimedia Metadata Standards – A Big Mess

Speaker:
Prof. Dr. Harald Kosch
Chair of Distributed Information Systems
University of Passau, Germany

Abstract:
The term „multimedia object” encompasses a wide variety of media items with different modalities and ever new coding standards. Also, each multimedia object passes through a number of processes throughout its life-cycle that store, use, modify, adapt, and present it. Multimedia metadata needs to capture this diversity in order to describe the multimedia object itself and its context. A large number of multimedia metadata standards exists coming from different organizations and application areas. This mini-keynote presents the actual standardization situation, reports on interoperability issues and current usages of the standards.

Bio:
Harald Kosch is a full professor at the University of Passau. His actual research topics are multimedia meta-data and databases, multimedia semantics, middleware and Internet applications. He started his research career at the École Normale Supérieure de Lyon in 1993 as a postgraduate student and entered the PhD program in 1994, completing it in June 1997. In 2002, he attained the habilitation at the University of Klagenfurt. In March 2006, he took over the Chair of Distributed Information Systems. Harald Kosch successfully participates in the W3C and MPEG standardization process. He is one of the co-founders of the multimedia metadata community, and owns several patents. He has been organizing many international conferences and workshops, as well as special issues covering different aspects of multimedia engineering, e.g., recently the Special Issue of IEEE MultiMedia -Multimedia-Metadata and Semantic Management.